Glen Turner (vk5tu) wrote,
Glen Turner
vk5tu

Activating IPv6 stable privacy addressing from RFC7217

Understand stable privacy addressing

In Three new things to know about deploying IPv6 I described the new IPv6 Interface Identifier creation scheme in RFC7217.* This scheme results in an IPv6 address which is stable, and yet has no relationship to the device's MAC address, nor can an address generated by the scheme be used to track the machine as it moves to other subnets.

This isn't the same as RFC4941 IP privacy addressing. RFC4941 addresses are more private, as they change regularly. But that instability makes attaching to a service on the host very painful. It's also not a great scheme for support staff: an unstable address complicates network fault finding. RFC7217 seeks a compromise position which provides an address which is difficult to use for host tracking, whilst retaining a stable address within a subnet to simplify fault finding and make for easy hosting of services such as SSH.

The older RFC4291 EUI-64 Interface Identifier scheme is being deprecated in favour of RFC7217 stable privacy addressing.

For servers you probably want to continue to use static addressing with a unique address per service. That is, a server running multiple services will hold multiple IPv6 addresses, and each service on the server bind()s to its address.

Configure stable privacy addressing

To activate the RFC7217 stable privacy addressing scheme in a Linux which uses Network Manager (Fedora, Ubuntu, etc) create a file /etc/NetworkManager/conf.d/99-local.conf containing:

[connection]
ipv6.ip6-privacy=0
ipv6.addr-gen-mode=stable-privacy

Then restart Network Manager, so that the configuration file is read, and restart the interface. You can restart an interface by physically unplugging it or by:

systemctl restart NetworkManagerip link set dev eth0 down && ip link set dev eth0 up

This may drop your SSH session if you are accessing the host remotely.

Verify stable privacy addressing

Check the results with:

ip --family inet6 addr show dev eth0 scope global
1: eth0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 state UP qlen 1000
    inet6 2001:db8:1:2:b03a:86e8:e163:2714/64 scope global noprefixroute dynamic 
       valid_lft 2591932sec preferred_lft 604732sec

The highlighted Interface Identifier part of the IPv6 address should have changed from the EUI-64 Interface Identifier; that is, the Interface Identifier should not contain any bytes of the interface's MAC address. The other parts of the IPv6 address — the Network Prefix, Subnet Identifier and Prefix Length — should not have changed.

If you repeat the test on a different subnet then the Interface Identifier should change. Upon returning to the original subnet the Interface Identifier should return to the original value.

Tags: linux
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